Tag Archives: the short and tragic life of robert peace

the short and tragic life of robert peace by jeff hobbs

The Short and Tragic Life of Robert PeaceAs I work backward through my backlogged book reviews, I now present you with my review of The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace: A Brilliant Young Man who Left Newark for the Ivy League by Jeff Hobbs, which is the second book that I finished in 2015 and is my favorite read of the year so far!

This book is beautifully written — you can tell the author spent countless hours studying the way other successful authors have crafted their timeless sentence structures. The Short and Tragic Life profiles, obviously, the life of Robert Peace from the relationship of his parents prior to Peace’s conception to how his family and friends deal with losing him after his death. The book is written by Peace’s college roommate which lends the book authenticity, but also means that the author inserts himself into the story at times, which can sometimes feel a bit awkward, but is completely understandable in context.

I’ll give a brief summary of the book, while trying not to reveal too much of its contents… this book discusses the early life of a young boy who is born into a low income family comprised of an extremely hardworking mother, an incarcerated and loving father (a reality that is sadly too common for many today), and dedicated grandparents. As Peace, an extremely intelligent child, navigates middle school and high school, Hobbs illuminates the struggle Peace must have felt to contribute to his family’s income, while trying to get himself to college, something no one in his immediate family had succeeded in doing before. When Peace enters a very prestigious university (and meets the author), he struggles to identify with the wealthy, privileged student body as a poor, black student. Hobbs describes this phase of Peace’s life and his struggle so incredibly well that this is the part of Robert Peace’s story that I always tell people about when I recommend this book to them. I have yet to read something that feels more authentic when describing how difficult it is to navigate fitting into an elite university’s student body when you differ from the majority. This othering of Peace very much influenced his college career and post-college trajectory and is a necessary read for anyone who is interested in higher education, socioeconomic differences, race, sociology, and the intersection of all of the above. Please, please read this book!

I originally read this book in order to participate in a Twitter book club led by Kat Chow, a journalist who covers race and culture for NPR’s Code Switch blog. As part of the book club, Kat and her twitter followers curated a list of books that are either about or are written by people of color. While the online book club seems to have died after the reading of the first selection, the list still lives and is a good reference point for adding things to your To-Be-Read pile. I have it saved in my bookmarks.

As I mourn the loss of my all too short stint of being in a digital book club, I was wondering if any of you have an online book club that you recommend me joining? I just joined a book of the month discussion inspired by Rory Gilmore (I started binging Gilmore Girls in February and am now almost done with the series…), but it doesn’t seem like it’ll be as active as I’m wanting. Are you in a book club that you’d like more people to join? Leave a comment and tell me more!

Publication date: 23 September 2014 by Scribner. Format: Hardcover.

Author: Jeff Hobbs GoodReads/Publisher Profile

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april round up

My book blog has been active for about a month which means I’m officially able to post my very first monthly roundup! Despite the fact that this is first month that the blog has really been active, I’ve got a ton of backlogged reviews of books (11 to be exact) read earlier this year that will be uploaded as I acquire more time to finally write the reviews (you can see sneak peeks of the reviews by checking out my GoodReads account). My goal is to read 52 books in 52 weeks and to eventually have a full 52 reviews posted by December 31, 2015. Thank you for joining me as I document my journey!


 April’s Book Reviews

Dad is Fat by Jim Gaffigan

Peter Pan by J. M. Barrie audiobook cover

A Field Guide to Awkward Silences by Alexandra Petri

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Audiobook Cover

 

Check out my reviews for the above books by clicking the book covers or by clicking the book titles here: Dad is Fat by Jim Gaffigan, Peter Pan by J. M. Barrie, A Field Guide to Awkward Silences by Alexandra Petri, and the Harry Potter series by J. K. Rowling.

Unfortunately, I wasn’t able to post reviews for all of the books I finished in April. In addition to the above books, I finished We Were Liars by E. Lockhart and Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins and those reviews will be coming in May!


April’s Book Haul

These are the books that I received during the month of April and may or may not be books that I was able to actively read during April. Books that are from the library have an increased likelihood of being read sooner due to the limited time that I have access to them.

Local Girls New York Regional Mormons Singles Halloween Dance Our Kids The Reptile Room

The Marriage Plot

Dad is Fat by Jim Gaffigan

Peter Pan by J. M. Barrie audiobook cover

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Audiobook Cover

 

 

 

 

  1. Local Girls by Caroline Zancan; Advance Reader Copy ebook from Penguin First to Read
  2. The New York Regional Mormon Singles Halloween Dance by Elna Baker; paperback from my friend Katherine when she came to visit me from Chicago in April
  3. Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis by Robert D. Putnam; hardcover from my work
  4. The Reptile Room by Lemony Snicket; hardcover from my partner when I saw him at a wedding in Dallas last weekend
  5. The Marriage Plot by Jeffrey Eugenides; audiobook from Brooklyn Public Library; currently reading
  6. Dad is Fat by Jim Gaffigan; audiobook from Brooklyn Public Library
  7. Peter Pan by J. M. Barrie; audiobook from Brooklyn Public Library
  8. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows; audiobook from Brooklyn Public Library

As I move forward with posting my book reviews, I’m hoping to balance adding a backlogged book review for every new book review that’s posted. I’m aiming to post the following January + February reads during the month of May.

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time Lord of the Flies The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace

 

 

 

 

  1. The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace by Jeff Hobbs
  2. Lord of the Flies by William Golding
  3. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon

& that’s it for my very first reading round up! Thank you for reading! If you have any tips for making my round ups more interesting to you, please share in the comments! If you feel inclined, check out my very new Instagram account and follow me on Twitter.