Tag Archives: the bell jar

My 5 Favorite Books I’ve Read in 2017 (so far)

At the end of 2016, I made a post about my 5 favorite reads of the year that was a hit. Since I’m on track to read more books this year than last, I’ve decided to round up a list of my five favorite books that I read during the first half of 2017 (January through June). The books aren’t ranked in any sort of way, but they were all fantastic to me in different ways. I’ve given my favorite reads mini reviews here, along with linking to their fuller reviews too. Let me know the title of your favorite book you’ve read this year in the comments! I’m already nearly done with some new reads that I feel like will make this list in December (like Mandy Len Catron’s How to Fall in Love with Anyone and the widely adored The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas)!!

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Mini Review: The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath

thebelljarHow have I gotten this far through life without anyone forcing me to read this book?? I started reading a friend’s copy and instantly felt compelled to highlight meaningful bits as I moved along. I had to acquire my own copy as I knew it would become a staple that lives on my bookshelf forever. My lovely friend (thanks Gabe!) bought me a copy while I visiting Brooklyn for the holidays. I love love loved this and felt like Plath describes a specific depression experience in young adulthood well. Since I also spent a bit of a time in New York in my early 20s and felt out of place while interning whilst all of my friends loved the glam of the city, I found those bits intriguing. I don’t particularly recommend reading this during the winter gloomy season as the holidays are approaching, as that time is already dark enough without needing something to plunge yourself deeper, but I’m not sure I would’ve liked it nearly as much if I had read it during a summery time.

Selected quotes:

“Either I got better, or I fell, down, down, like a burning, then burnt-out star.” (p. 209)

“I didn’t want my pictures taken because I was going to cry. I didn’t know why I was going to cry, but I knew that if anybody spoke to me or looked at me too closely the tears would fly out of my throat and I’d cry for a week. I could feel the tears brimming and sloshing in me like water in a glass that is unsteady and too full.”(p. 100-101)

“I felt now that all the uncomfortable suspicions I had about myself were coming true, and I couldn’t hide the truth much longer. After nineteen years of running after good marks and prizes and grants of one sort and another, I was letting up, slowing down, and dropping clean out of the race.” (p. 29)

“If you expect nothing from somebody you are never disappointed.” (p. 59)