Tag Archives: review

Mini Review: I Hate Everyone, but You by Gaby Dunn & Allison Raskin

ihateeveryonebutyouThis book was ANNOYING!! Is it normal in teen friendships for one friend to be mostly terrible and one to be mostly great and for an outside observer (or reader in this case) to root for the two to stay friends? I think not. Instead of encouraging these two misfit friends to grow with other friends who align more with their interests, we see the two main characters (Aza and Gen) repeatedly force themselves to continue being friends with their closest friend from high school. While hints about this not being the best friendship came up a few times, I would have liked the toxicity of the friendship to have directly been addressed instead of slightly implied and magically resolved so that people reading this novel don’t think that represents a normal, healthy friendship that they should continue to contribute to.

I laughed a lot with Gen’s dialogue and found her to be a pretty enjoyable character that I would’ve liked to have seen in a different story. I really liked the novel format of the book, which is entirely consists of relayed emails and text messages. I really loved the concept of two high school best friends who are navigating the friendship growing pains of each friend individually going in a different direction, but I did not like the execution of this book at all. The two authors are pretty famous on the internet, particularly YouTube, but I was unfamiliar with them before I had read the book so my impressions of them didn’t make me read this with rose-colored lenses. The main characters also both have names that begin with the same letters as the authors’ names… make of that what you will.

 

Publication Date: 5 September 2017 by Wednesday BooksFormat: Hardcover.

Author: Gaby Dunn YouTube/@twitter/@instagram and Allison Raskin YouTube/@twitter/@instagram

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Mini Review: Do What You Want by Ruby Tandoh and Leah Pritchard

Screen Shot 2017-05-28 at 5.15.45 PMI had to stop all of my plans the day I was reading this because this was SO GOOD, but it also made me want to collapse into a puddle of tears. Reading about other people’s mental health always makes me feel some type of way — comforted by feeling seen through shared experiences but shattered that so many people have these same experiences and feelings. That said, it was great to see a range of different types of mental health covered (in addition to the heavily talked about depression and anxiety), along with the factors that can contribute to issues developing and the aftermath that can be caused after issues emerge. This is primarily a zine (though can it technically be a zine if it has a ISBN number?) about mental health with a few recipes sprinkled throughout, contrary to my friend’s and my belief that it would be an equally balanced food and mind zine since one of the editors is Great British Bake Off‘s Ruby Tandoh.

Coffee in the photo is courtesy of Chicago’s Bang Bang Pie & Biscuits and will be included in a future coffee review post of all of the coffee beans I’ve tried for my cold brew creations.

Silver Linings Playbook by Matthew Quick

silverliningsplaybookMy boyfriend asked me to read this and so I did. I introduce my review this way because this is a novel that I wouldn’t have picked up on my own – I didn’t find the movie to be Academy worthy *cough* and I didn’t find the premise particularly compelling. However, the book is actually quite different from the film and presents a much more engaging story.

Pat, the book’s lead character, begins the story in a mental institution (also known as “the bad place”) and most of the book follows him trying to come to terms with his reality: he now lives at home with his parents, years having passed since he entered the “bad place” and he isn’t fully aware of exactly a) how much time has passed, b) what has changed, or c) what caused him to leave his old reality. The best parts of the book consisted of descriptions of Pat navigating his present reality and understanding that he has, and will likely always have, mental wellness dilemmas.

The love story component wasn’t that interesting and walks a thin line adjacent to the manic pixie dream girl trope. I forgave this since the narrator was so intensely focused and had a hard time practicing empathy with anyone, making me believe that storyline was intentionally written that way. Overall, Silver Linings Playbook was a very quick + breezy read, but I’m not sure I’ll remember much about the story a year from now.

Mini Review: Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty

biglittleliesBig Little Lies was a delightful & quick read that I recommend for anyone interested in pop thrillers. Of the pop thrillers I’ve read (Gone Girl, The Girl on the Train), Big Little Lies is by far the best of the batch! Lots of little jokes are wormed in around the several disasters that crop up throughout the book. I was able to predict the biggest plot twist, but everyone I know who has read it wasn’t able to. Despite being able to predict the big twist, I was still extremely satisfied with how the book wrapped up, a rare feeling when figuring out a plot point before you’re meant to. There are lots of funny bits about family life in suburbia and a slew of delightful characters that made me want to constantly return to this book as a distraction from real life. Plus, there are plenty of true facts about domestic, physical, and emotional abuse woven throughout the novel that will hopefully help readers understand how these terrible things can take multiple forms and cause readers to be more aware of these very serious, but unfortunately very common issues that plague so many.

If you or someone you know may be in a situation that involves domestic violence or abuse, please visit this website for a list of resources.

5 Favorite Reads from 2016

After a seven month hiatus, I am FINALLY back!! My personal life was a bit of a whirlwind last year (i.e. 2016 the year that magically destroyed everyone in little ways) which led me to de-prioritize this blog. I fled to Europe for a month, leaving my home country for the first time ever (!!!), and visited Paris, London, Edinburgh, and Amsterdam. I moved across the country from Brooklyn to Chicago and I became a PhD student! Lots of changes happened and now that I feel more settled in Chicago, I’ve decided to try to pick up some of the things that I allowed myself to drop in 2016.

Instead of trying to add reviews for all of the books I gobbled down in 2016, I’ve compiled a list of my favorite reads from 2016. These are not ranked in any order except for the first book being my absolute 2016 favorite! Of the 32 books I read in 2016, here are my favorite five.


alittlelifeA Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara.

While I didn’t post a full review of this book on the blog, I did blog about attending a book event with the fantastic author here. I made my book club read and love this book. It was my read during a magical winter trip to Austin, TX where I escaped the winter blues in 2016. This book deserves a longer review than this, but it’s tied to too many emotions for me. I’ll leave you with the bite that I shared with people who messaged me on Tinder in 2016: it’s emotionally brutal, but beautifully written.

Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coatesbetweentheworldandme

This is the only book in the list that received a full review! My university is doing an event with the author at the end of January and I hope I’m able to secure a ticket to see him speak in person. Here’s a snippet from my longer review: The book is part memoir, part current American history and is written as a letter directly to the author’s son. Coates detailed the lessons that he was forced to learn as a black man growing up in America and contrasted them from the lessons his father had to learn and the lessons his son has already learned or will have to learn in an incredibly moving way.

Tiny Beautiful Things by Cheryl Strayedtinybeautifulthings

I will come back to this book again & again. I will recommend this to friends again & again. When I am hurting, I will return to this again & again. Each piece of this book made me think of different people I know who would benefit from reading each individual excerpt. All of the excerpts are deeply particular, yet universal. I’m not really a “self help” type and haven’t read something like this in ages, but this was perfect and helped me examine all of my jagged shards and choose to hold them with my bare hands anyway.

illgiveyouthesunI’ll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson.

This was my favorite YA read of 2016 and I love it even more because I procured it from a magical book shop in Paris. I have never read a book quite like this — there are paint splatters on pages that add depth to the stories and emphasize certain points and it’s so DAMN BEAUTIFUL. As is the story which features siblings and first loves and first mistakes and struggling with the love (or lack thereof) of a parent. It’s perfect. I loved it. Read it.

Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandelstationeleven

I wish someone had made me read this sooner! This is a perfect dystopian novel that feels the most realistic of any I’ve read. Reading this will make you reflect on mortality, morality, and the potential unspooling of civilization. There were quite a few excerpts that were so well worded that I came back to them again and again because of the self reflection they encouraged. This novel could have easily been much longer, but it’s a tight, well constructed story. Read it! But probably not while flying on a plane…


& that’s all, folks! In the future, you can expect slightly more condensed reviews of the books I pursue in 2017. I’m reading and writing for fun less since so much of my daily life is reading and writing for graduate school which will be reflected in the reviews I post here. What were your favorite reads of 2016?

2016 Book Goals

I originally started this blog to keep me accountable for reading 52 books in 2015 (aka a book a week). It took me until the very last day of 2015 to accomplish that goal, but I can now say that I did it! Woohoo! Very proud of myself!

In order to tackle that goal, I had to place some of my other media consumption on pause. I’m over a month behind on the podcasts that I subscribe to (check out this post for 10 recommended podcasts) and I have a pile of magazines that I need to catch up on as well.

For 2016, I am halving 2015’s goal to 26 books. I’ve decided to do this because I want to:

  • spend my free time consuming more than just books,
  • be able to dive into *HUGE* books like A Little Life and Infinite Jest instead of being deterred from them because they won’t make a dent in my reading goals despite taking up a hefty chunk of my time,
  • and write reviews for at least 26 books in 2016 (even though I read 52 books in 2015, I didn’t have time to write reviews for all of them).

For a full list of the books I read in 2015, you can check out this page on my blog or this list on Goodreads. In the coming weeks, I’ll likely put together some recommendations for books based on my previous reviews and post extended reviews of the books I finished in December 2015, but haven’t posted about on the blog yet. I’ve already jumped into 2016’s reading pool by finishing We Should All be Feminists by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (thank you for sending it to me, Amy!) and starting the graphic novel Are You My Mother? by Alison Bechdel which my partner gave me for Christmas.

& That’s a wrap on my bookish 2015 and a peek into my 2016. Thank you for following me on my reading journey.

fun home by alison bechdel

funhomeatthebeachAs someone who hasn’t read many graphic novels (aka I’ve only read Persepolis prior to this), I wasn’t sure if I would like Fun Home by Alison Bechdel. I brought this book along with me to a weekend getaway at my friend’s earlier this month and it was the perfect beach read. By that, I mean, I was able to finish the novel after devoting a single day to reading it at the beach and it was absolutely lovely! If you’re looking for a book to read for a few hours on a getaway, plane, or train, I definitely recommend taking this along with you.

Fun Home is a graphic novel written by the oh-so-talented Alison Bechdel. Before reading her graphic novel, I wasn’t familiar with any of Bechdel’s illustrated works. I knew of Bechdel because of the now legendary “Bechdel Test” though Bechdel has since said she doesn’t actually deserve recognition for the creation of the test (she does deserve recognition for it becoming more known). I knew of the title because of the Broadway musical adaptation’s successful Tony award wins and decided to purchase this book to find out if I wanted to see the musical performed.

The novel is autobiographical and details Bechdel’s childhood growing up in rural Pennsylvania and details her exploration of self, sexuality, and gender identity from childhood through her early college years. The novel mainly focuses on her relationship with and interpretation of her father and concludes with her assessment of her father’s death and impact upon her life. While this book is autobiographical, I felt like it spent more time devoted to exploring her father as a character than detailing her own life and, at times, felt more like an exercise for Bechdel to explore how she actually felt about her relationship with her father. I found myself annoyed at the lack of exploration of Bechdel’s mother’s role in her life, who seemed like she often received the short end of the stick, but, as I’m writing this entry, I found out that Bechdel wrote a companion graphic novel entitled Are You My Mother? which I look forward to reading soon.

As someone with a complicated relationship with my parents who is seemingly constantly analyzing the impact of my parents upon who I am as a person today, I greatly enjoyed reading Bechdel analyze her father’s impact and her attempts to separate who he was as a person from who he was as a father. While I enjoyed the parental exploration, my favorite parts of the novel involved Bechdel’s exploration of sexual identity and gender exploration, which I think particularly lends itself to being told through illustrations. Bechdel perfectly describes the process of how she came to understand a piece of who she was sexually and that was the highlight of the reading process for me.

This book is dark and explores some heavy things that you might not expect from a graphic novel – “fun home” is short for funeral home, after all. If you’re okay with authentic storylines that are brushed with grimness and are at all interested in a young person’s exploration of sexual and gender identity, I recommend reading this book.

Do you have any recommendations for other graphic novels that I should try out? I just put a hold on Are You My Mother? from my local library and am interested in exploring other graphic novels if they come with a good recommendation!

Publication Date: 8 June 2006 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Format: Paperback.

Author: Alison Bechdel web/@twitter/facebook