Tag Archives: picador

Call Me by Your Name by André Aciman

IMG_8489I wanted to love this book, I really did, but it wasn’t a match for me. I recognized the book and I were not jiving about 30 pages in, but I kept pushing through anyway (does anyone have tips for putting a book down when you know it’s not for you?? Please share with me!!). This book is full of pages and pages and pages of teenage longing from afar. Maybe it’s because I’m passed the point in my life of finding familiarity in these feelings, but I found the longing to be extremely boring.

In the novel, teenager Elio spends most of his time longing for young adult Oliver, a visiting scholar working on his manuscript while visiting Elio’s academic family in Italy. About three-quarters into the novel, the plot picks up when Oliver and Elio tentatively verbalize their perceived connection to each other and begin exploring it further. While I preferred this slightly to the prior pieces of the novel, it wasn’t enough to counteract my boring impression of the novel. The standout piece of the novel is when Elio goes to visit Oliver several years after their summer together and reflects on the many ways their lives could have been different, thinking of the ways lovers do and do not shape our lives even when they are no longer physically present. But was this one beautiful bit enough? Unfortunately no.

Altogether, Call Me by Your Name was simply too slow of a book for me. I didn’t like the characters enough to be satisfied with the slow pace and overall lack of plot for most of the novel. Maybe if I had seen the film version of this book, I would have been more forgiving.

Publication Date: 23 January 2007 by PicadorFormat: Paperback.

Author: André Aciman @twitter

Advertisements

One Day We’ll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter by Scaachi Koul

IMG_8187I received Scaachi Koul’s debut in my great Christmas book haul of 2017 and I adored it! Koul is a news reporter at Buzzfeed and wrote an excellent essay about A Series of Unfortunate Events that put her on my radar (please read it here or this magnificent piece about Sufjan Stevens that I only found today if you want to get a taste of her style and the things that interest her). The point of view that shines through in her Buzzfeed essays is cranked up to 1000 in One Day We’ll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter, a memoir of personal essays about the experiences she’s had so far. She sprinkles in some stories about growing up in Canada with Indian parents, going back to India and being othered because she’s “western”, but also not exactly fitting in within all western contexts either, a few college stories, and a gloss over adulthood and relationships. It was a quick read and gives a reader a glimpse into lots of different territories without wading in any of them too long. My favorite essay is titled “Aus-piss-ee-ous” and covers attending a cousin’s wedding ceremony in India and feeling out of place with the traditions and realizing that even her Indian relatives aren’t quite comfortable with the traditions either, but go along with it anyway. Koul’s book is excellent, very entertaining, and tonally felt like catching up with a friend over beers. I recommend!

Publication Date: 7 March 2017 by Picador. Format: Paperback.

Author: Scaachi Koul @twitter/@instagram/facebook

The Lonely City Book Event at Community Bookstore

I’ve had my head so up in the clouds lately that I completely forgot to post about attending a lovely book event a few weeks ago. On March 15, 2016, I went to a book event + signing for Olivia Laing’s The Lonely City: Adventures in the Art of Being Alone at Community Bookstore in Brooklyn, NY.  A small group of my friends had decided that this would be our next book club read after A Little Life (book review coming soon! I’m actually going to a book event featuring that author of that work tomorrow evening…) and I coincidentally found that a book event was being hosted in our borough in the next few days! Talk about perfect timing!

olivialaingpackedhouse.png

Author Olivia Laing reading an excerpt from her new book The Lonely City to a packed house at Community Bookstore.

Laing began her event by discussing the research she put into her book, which is a blend of mostly nonfiction with a brush of memoir. Laing describes the lives of (mostly visual) artists and their surrounding loneliness, regardless of the number of people they had in their lives. After moving to New York and finding herself without attachments, Laing occupied herself by exploring her own loneliness and the loneliness of different artists through 2 years of research into their lives and their art.laingreading

In her previous work The Trip to Echo Spring, she intertwined alcoholism with the lives of authors. At the event, Laing mentioned that she could’ve tied the lives of authors with the concept of loneliness too, but that she felt like urban loneliness was very visual.
When describing urban loneliness, which Laing also experienced when living in New York, she said something along the lines of (aka this is not a direct quote):

There’s an experience of being in a city where you can see much more than you can reach. You can see many people, but you can’t connect with them. You feel isolated and agonizingly exposed. They run parallel and intensify each other.

I think the idea that Laing articulated is something that anyone who has ever been in an urban setting has experienced: the feeling of being physically surrounded by other living beings, but being disconnected from social or emotional links to others. As Laing quite concisely added,

Loneliness isn’t a lack of people, it’s a lack of intimacy.

I’m very much looking forward to diving into The Lonely City soon and you can bet it will be added to my #findabook rotation and hopefully be discovered by a lonely wanderer.

Side note: I had never been to this bookstore before and I will be returning soon! Community Bookstore had the BEST kids + YA section I’ve seen in a New York bookstore. I’ve tried to find some specific titles at many bookstores in the area and Community Bookstore had more on the shelf than I’ve seen elsewhere!