Tag Archives: penguin

Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng

Screen Shot 2018-09-03 at 1.00.11 PMI’ve been on the hunt for a used copy of Everything I’ve Never Told You by Celeste Ng ALL SUMMER, after reading and devouring her second release Little Fires Everywhere. After finally finding it (thanks to a dear friend!) and reading her two books, I can confidently say I’ll be reading and devouring anything Ng writes for the rest of our days. 

Everything I loved about the writing style of Little Fires Everywhere also lives within Everything I’ve Never Told You. Ng weaves seamlessly between multiple characters and it appears effortless (though I’ve never read anything quite like this, so I suspect it takes immense effort to give off that vibe). All of the characters in this novel are in one family unit, each with their own problems, personalities, and perceptions of each other’s problems and personalities. Ng makes each of them feel incredibly real, giving nuance to every situation that you find yourself identifying with whoever is the current narrator. (Can you tell that I could harp about Ng’s talents for days?)

This story revolves around the Lee family: Marilyn is the stay at home mother, longing for the time when she was one of the only women pursuing a science career in higher education. Marilyn was born to a single home economics teacher who longed for her a life of being a stay at home mother. Marilyn grows up in Virginia, where racism against anyone who is not white, as she and her mother are, seep into interactions directly or slightly. At university, Marilyn falls for a doctoral student named Jason, who is Chinese. The two eventually form a family and have three children who go to a mostly white school. While they each have different struggles in their daily lives, the book is centered around the sudden death of one of the children. What follows is a fantastic narrative of a family navigating their grief and relationships with each other, with all of their sticky every day difficulties piled atop.

Ng poignantly and craftily captures family dynamics, grief, and identity in magnificent ways. I can’t wait to read what she writes next. 

Publication Date: 12 May 2015 by PenguinFormat: Paperback.

Author: Celeste Ng web/@twitter/@instagram

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The Kiss Quotient by Helen Hoang

kissquotientLast summer I was obsessed with the funny and steamy Vow of Celibacy (which if you haven’t read yet, do so!!) and I was thrilled to find a book that had a similar vibe this summer, but was completely different.

The Kiss Quotient by Helen Hoang is one of the sexiest books I have ever read, probably because I usually avoid steamy reads. However, this book came strongly recommended from all of my bookish IRL friends, so I scooped it up and it quickly made the rounds in one of my friend groups for very good reason. The novel twists between two main narrators, Stella, an extremely successful analyst who finds her work generally more interesting than any human connection or hobby, and Michael, a man who chooses to become an escort to repay financial debts that don’t seem to be going away anytime soon. 

Stella comes to believe that she isn’t well versed “enough” in romantic and physical relationships, so she hires Michael with the hopes that he will catch her up to speed. What follows is a fantastic story of Michael trying to help Stella comfortably engage in a relationship, at her speed, doing what she wants. In the process, they fall in love of course, but the nature of their meeting complicates their understanding of each other’s feelings. It was downright romantic and very sexy and I read this entire book way too quickly. 

While the physical parts of the relationship take up a chunk of the book, so do the plot points surrounding Stella’s general discomfort with becoming close to most people, how her Asperger’s impacts her interactions with the world, and how Michael’s secret profession is at odds with his strained relationship with his tight-knit family. Every piece of this novel felt well crafted and divine. The entire time I was reading this book, it felt like diving into one of the best romcoms I’ve encountered in a while. I thoroughly recommend!

Publication Date: 5 June 2018 by BerkleyFormat: Paperback.

Author: Helen Hoang web/@instagram/facebook/@twitter

Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli

Screen Shot 2018-07-22 at 12.23.34 PMThis book was delightful! I picked up this book with the intention of leveraging it into some conversations with my dear 12 year old cousin. Not only did it successfully allow us to have some really great conversations together (we talked at length about how it’s unfair that straight people don’t have to come out as straight, a topic mentioned throughout the book), it was a fantastic and fun book to read!

Simon, the main character, is comfortable with and certain of his sexuality (a welcome alternanarrative to a lot of YA books; questioning is definitely important to represent, but I liked getting the chance to read something different), but doesn’t feel compelled to share his romantic preference with others. That is, until he’s outed at school. After writing a series of “anonymous” emails to another high schooler who is also attracted to their same sex, his identity is leaked after someone stumbles upon his emails via an unlocked public computer disaster. Simon navigates being thrust into being out, whilst dealing with other typical teenage problems. 

While the main story is a great read, the backdrop is also fantastic. Simon and his friends quirkily quip amongst each other, leading to many laughs from me. His friends also spend ample time in a Waffle House, one of my favorite hangs while a high schooler, so I found those bits particularly enjoyable.

If you’re looking for a quick, enjoyable read full of interesting and fun characters, this book is for you! It’s also a great way touchstone to use when talking to young people about certain experiences and I thoroughly recommend it for those purposes too! I still haven’t seen the movie that is based upon the book (and has received many glowing reviews), but it’s on my to do list!

Publication Date: 7 April 2015 by Penguin. Format: Paperback.

Author: Becky Albertalli web/@twitter/@instagram/@facebook

Brotopia: Breaking Up the Boys’ Club of Silicon Valley by Emily Chang

IMG_8788A lovely friend mailed me this book when she found out that I would be moving to and working in Silicon Valley — and Brotopia (justifiably) terrified me. Emily Chang, a journalist and newscaster for Bloomberg, dives into the murky waters that is the oft-times described “boys’ clubs” of Silicon Valley. Chang brilliantly uses her connections as a reporter to land interviews (both on the record and off) with lots of powerful people within Silicon Valley. The author presents a history of Silicon Valley and the many ways that sexism and misogyny have been steeped into its being since its creation. By weaving together research, articles, and interviews with those involved, the reader will feel better able to understand the reality of the tech industry’s home. Not only does Chang deftly describe the history and current state of Silicon Valley (including its e(xc)lusive sex parties), she offers solutions for change, based on research and her impressions as someone who has been thoroughly immersed in exploring these issues for years. While pieces of Brotopia left me feeling disheartened, Chang’s final tone made me feel hopeful for change. 

This was an essential read for me, coming into Silicon Valley without knowing much about its roots, and also motivated me to prepare myself with resources and knowledge that would hopefully help me succeed in this environment. The book is accessible, well researched, and offers actionable suggestions for change. If you’re interested in understanding the context of Silicon Valley, I absolutely recommend this book. 

Publication Date: 6 February 2018 by PortfolioFormat: Hardcover.

Author: Emily Chang @twitter/web/TV show/Bloomberg

Crux: A Cross-Border Memoir by Jean Guerrero

cruxJean Guerrero, the author of this memoir, is a journalist documenting her family history as means to try to understand her relationship with and the realities of her father. Guerrero weaves together the narratives of her family members, going back several generations, finding strands to connect their journeys to each other. While she details her maternal side at points, most of the story digs into her paternal side, perhaps because her father was a mystery to her, she knew his pathway was more “interesting,” or because it was geographically closer to the places she wanted to investigate. Guerrero tells her own story, along with the stories of many others either directly from their own mouths or stories that have been passed down for generations. On her father’s side of the family, MexiCali (the area of Mexico and California that are close to each other) plays a central role, with family members traversing back and forth from one country to the other before the border was as strictly enforced as it was now. Guerrero has some reflections on citizenship and identifying with one of the countries or the other when one is going between them frequently. Themes of magic or future telling, ranging from shamanistic to clairvoyance to dabbling in Wicca texts, recur frequently, connecting generations of the family seemingly initially unbeknownst to each who seemed to practice individually. I found Guerrero’s and her family’s tales very intriguing and enjoyed tracing the details as Guerrero attempted to understand the factors that influenced her family members into becoming the people they were and are. If you want a deep dive into a memoir that explores a specific family system, this will be an interesting read for you!

Disclaimer: I was provided with a digital copy of this book for free from One World via NetGalley. All opinions expressed in the review are my own and have not been influenced by One World or NetGalley.

Publication Date: 17 July 2018 by One WorldFormat: ARC e-book.

Author: Jean Guerrero web/@twitter/@instagram

Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng

image1 (11)Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng is the best book that I have read in 2018 and I have already recommended it to at least 10 people in one week. I liked the novel so much that I’m trying to think of the best way to succinctly describe it without giving away too much of the story… the actual pieces of the story aren’t necessarily riveting enough to make you think that this will be one of the best reads you’ll stumble upon this year, but the nuts and bolts are brilliant! Don’t sleep on this book just because the synopsis isn’t immediately gripping!

The author, Ng, expertly weaves together several characters, revealing snippets of their consciences and actions effervescently. The characters, many of which have different, conflicting personalities and perspectives, are deftly captured, causing the reader to sympathize with characters they may have initially detested. A theme that recurs for many of the characters is their struggle to understand the priorities and beliefs of a character juxtaposed with them and their choice to either lean into rigidity and rules or to seemingly be float away from those expectations. Some of the main bits that characters consider during their sensemaking processes are the nature of parent-child relationships and the underpinning of race at a point in America where many people were claiming not to see race. The latter piece specifically manifests around the differing public opinions about a white couple adopting a Chinese baby, a local issue that ultimately divides the suburb.

Because of the novel’s insightful, biting critique of suburbia and the expectation that a suburb’s implicit ideals are universally upheld by its residents, the book reminded me slightly of Big Little Lies (minus the underlying murderous currents). Similar to that tale, Little Fires Everywhere is also being adapted into a television series with Reese Witherspoon attached and I cannot wait to watch it! I know the vague synopsis alone may not sound compelling enough to read this book, but please snatch it up to dive into this world before it’s on screen! I’ll be sure to also check out Ng’s debut, Everything I Never Told You, before the year concludes too.

Publication Date: 12 September 2017 by Penguin PressFormat: Hardcover.

Author: Celeste Ng web/@twitter/@instagram

The Wedding Date by Jasmine Guillory

image1 (8)The Wedding Date, the debut novel from Jasmine Guillory, delighted me from start to finish! This snazzy book encapsulates a romcom that I kept imagining as a movie in my head (make this into a movie! I will watch in my pjs while drinking hot cocoa and listening to the rain hit my windows!!). The story switches between the two main narrators, Alexa, a powerful lawyer now working for the mayor of Berkeley, and Drew, a powerful pediatrician, who spontaneously meet in a broken elevator (Shonda — produce this as a movie! I know you love a good elevator scene!) and have instant chemistry. What follows are the twists and turns of trying to figure out the beginnings of situationship (not agreed to being a relationship at the beginning, but kinda spurred on by a random situation) and the anxieties that can play into entering an undefined repeated encounter with someone that you’re desperate for more of. The characters are cute, have funny flaws, and I loved reading their thoughts! The book also got me excited about San Francisco, where the majority of the book takes place and where I’ll be living this summer. Head’s up: this book does describe *quite* a few sex scenes, and while I might be a bit prude-ish in that I find more than one scene in a book to be gratuitous, I still had so much fun reading this book and you especially will if this is your cup of tea! You can bet that Guillory’s second book, The Proposal, is already on my To-Read list.

Publication Date: 30 January 2018 by Berkley BooksFormat: Paperback.

Author: Jasmine Guillory web/@twitter/@instagram/facebook