Tag Archives: knopf

Chemistry by Weike Wang

image1 (4)As someone currently stumbling through a PhD program, I was delighted to read a book about a character tripping, falling, and removing themselves from similar circumstances. PhD programs are super weird and demanding in different ways that are hard to explain to people who haven’t pursued one so I gobble up opportunities to hear about experiences, even fictional, navigating the strange world of PhDs. 

Chemistry by Weike Wang is almost like a diary/stream of consciousness of the main, unnamed character. She’s in a Chemistry PhD program, which are known to be notoriously demanding because of time required to be physically present in a lab to run experiments, and she’s completely flailing. Some of the “chapters” are simply written with thoughts that sometimes seem half-formed, as if they are the real thoughts of someone who is feeling quite a bit lost and not sure of where to turn next. 

The main character has Chinese parents who are no longer in the U.S. and their extreme expectations for the main character highlight her struggle between the “American dream” and her parents’ evaluation of what it means to succeed in America. This is juxtaposed with her white, American boyfriend’s comparatively easy experience of success because he isn’t simultaneously struggling to barely meet his parents’ expectations of all of the things they perceive he should also be accomplishing.  Most of the struggle in this book is related to the main character’s  parents’ expectations and demands not aligning with what would ultimately help her reach personal and professional happiness and the juxtaposition of the ease of her boyfriend to excel through the same program. 

Some readers may wish that this had more depth, but I enjoyed the brevity! There are some beautiful little bits (the deer metaphor was my favorite!) that are sandwiched in here that would be easy to miss if you were speed reading. I suspect that enjoyment of this book might be limited to those familiar with PhD programs or those interested in the family dynamics. If either of those sound like stories you want to read, scoop this up!

Publication Date: 23 May 2017 by Knopf PublishingFormat: Hardcover.

Author: Weike Wang bio

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Dear Ijeawele, or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Screen Shot 2017-06-19 at 12.09.13 PMThis was good and I’ve yet to read something by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie that I haven’t been impressed by or hasn’t provoked me into thinking about something slightly differently than I did before. This thin, little book is composed as a letter to a friend who was seeking advice on how to raise her daughter as a feminist. Adichie offers 15 suggestions, specifically linking them to Nigerian, Igbo, and western cultures, but even these specific examples are still universal. Adichie admits that these tenants may be hard to accomplish, but we must strive to embody them to create feminists in our children and in ourselves.

A few choice quotes are below:

“Be deliberate about showing her the enduring beauty and resiliences of Africans and of black people. Why? Because of the power dynamics in the world, she will grow up seeing images of white beauty, white ability, and white achievement, no matter where she is in the world. It will be in the TV shows she watches, in the popular culture she consumes, in the books she reads. She will also probably grow up seeing many negative images of blackness and of Africans.” (p. 40)

“We ask of powerful women: Is she humble? Does she smile? Is she grateful enough? Does she have a domestic side? Question we do not ask of powerful men, which shows that our discomfort is not with power itself, but with women.” (p. 24)

“If we stopped conditioning women to see marriage as a prize, then we would have fewer debates about a wife needing to cook in order to earn that prize.” (p. 15)

“Don’t think that raising her feminist means forcing her to reject femininity.” (p. 43)

“Social norms are created by human beings, and there is no social norm that cannot be changed.” (p. 51)

the circle by dave eggers

thecircleThis was my first ever Dave Eggers read and I regret it being the first that dove into. My partner loved A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius, which is the memoir and debut of Eggers, and I’m not sure why I didn’t choose to read that book first. While I’ve heard great things about the writing style of Eggers, likely stemming from reflections on his memoir, I wasn’t impressed with The Circle

I’ve read quite a few futuristic novels that take place in technology over saturated worlds and I was beginning to think I was simply burned out on reading more renditions of the same story (spoiler alert: I was proved wrong when I recently read and LOVED Ready Player One by Ernest Cline; review coming soon!). The Circle‘s spin features a technology and digital company that is very similar to a blend of  Google and Apple, which allows the reader to envision that the world Eggers has created could actually exist if some things about our current world changed. The reader is introduced to the world through Mae, a young college graduate, who joins The Circle thanks to being recommended for a job by her college best friend. The Circle, as a company and not as the title of the book, is comprised of a leading search engine, a social media platform, and a leading technology innovation team.

During Mae’s time at The Circle, she can be a bit boring boring at times, even as her actions advance herself through the company’s ranks. Mae’s boringness is perhaps intentional so that she can be easily molded and manipulated by other characters in the book to advance the plot, but ultimately left me feeling put off and like Mae was a cog in the machine without any agency. Mae’s trust of The Circle is balanced by her parents and her ex-boyfriend who are very critical of how The Circle is completely overtaking the society that they live in; they seem to represent the views that Eggers himself perhaps holds about society’s relationship with technology. Because of this, the whole novel felt like a condemnation of our reliance on technology. The easy condemnation seemed lazy and more like a writing exercise than a full fledged novel. That said, I’m looking forward to reading some of his nonfiction in the future.

While I was listening to the audiobook of this novel, it was announced that Emma Watson would be starring in the movie version of the book. I can’t really envision how this will be adapted to the big screen, but I look forward to mindlessly watching it on an airplane sometime in the future.

Have you read any Dave Eggers works? Do you think his nonfiction pieces are superior to his fictional novels? Let me know in the comments!

Publication Date: 8 October 2013 by McSweeney’s and Knopf. Format: Digital Audiobook from Random House Audio.

Author: Dave Eggers Publisher Page

Narrator: Dion Graham IMDB