Tag Archives: death

Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng

Screen Shot 2018-09-03 at 1.00.11 PMI’ve been on the hunt for a used copy of Everything I’ve Never Told You by Celeste Ng ALL SUMMER, after reading and devouring her second release Little Fires Everywhere. After finally finding it (thanks to a dear friend!) and reading her two books, I can confidently say I’ll be reading and devouring anything Ng writes for the rest of our days. 

Everything I loved about the writing style of Little Fires Everywhere also lives within Everything I’ve Never Told You. Ng weaves seamlessly between multiple characters and it appears effortless (though I’ve never read anything quite like this, so I suspect it takes immense effort to give off that vibe). All of the characters in this novel are in one family unit, each with their own problems, personalities, and perceptions of each other’s problems and personalities. Ng makes each of them feel incredibly real, giving nuance to every situation that you find yourself identifying with whoever is the current narrator. (Can you tell that I could harp about Ng’s talents for days?)

This story revolves around the Lee family: Marilyn is the stay at home mother, longing for the time when she was one of the only women pursuing a science career in higher education. Marilyn was born to a single home economics teacher who longed for her a life of being a stay at home mother. Marilyn grows up in Virginia, where racism against anyone who is not white, as she and her mother are, seep into interactions directly or slightly. At university, Marilyn falls for a doctoral student named Jason, who is Chinese. The two eventually form a family and have three children who go to a mostly white school. While they each have different struggles in their daily lives, the book is centered around the sudden death of one of the children. What follows is a fantastic narrative of a family navigating their grief and relationships with each other, with all of their sticky every day difficulties piled atop.

Ng poignantly and craftily captures family dynamics, grief, and identity in magnificent ways. I can’t wait to read what she writes next. 

Publication Date: 12 May 2015 by PenguinFormat: Paperback.

Author: Celeste Ng web/@twitter/@instagram

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Mini Review: The Sky is Everywhere by Jandy Nelson

theskyiseverywhereAfter being obsessed with Jandy Nelson’s most recent novel, I’ll Give You the Sun, one of my favorite reads of 2016, I was so excited to receive Nelson’s debut, The Sky is Everywhere. Unfortunately, I think my expectations were set a little too high for this. Nelson continues her magical way of slipping in different media formats into her books (this time around it’s poems and conversations written on slips of paper, crushed up paper cups, sides of buildings, etc.), but the actual story didn’t grip my heart in the same way as I’ll Give You the Sun. All that considered, this was a nice, innovative read about a young teenager who is struggling with understanding her own identity after experiencing the sudden death of her sister. I enjoyed reading The Sky is Everywhere, but I didn’t find myself fully consumed by the story like I was with Nelson’s other work.

Publication Date: 9 March 2010 by Dial BooksFormat: Paperback.

Author: Jandy Nelson web/facebook

I’m Just a Person by Tig Notaro

imjustaperson

I love Tig Notaro, which might just be because her mom died and she talks about it all of the time. It greatly influenced who she is and I relate to that. I always wonder if my obsession with my own mother’s death is because I was so young when it happened, but I don’t think that’s the case after reading Notaro’s account of losing her mother during middle adulthood. Loss of loved ones will always profoundly affect me because I love so much and I am a culmination of those I love and who love me, something that Notaro shares in her memoir about her own life. 

Notaro had a hell of a two years: she got diagnosed with a rare, potentially fatal infection, her mother died suddenly, she and her girlfriend broke up, she learned she had breast cancer, she experienced fertility issues, and so much more. This book details those experiences and expounds upon Tig’s wonderings about life, ties to family and friendship, and her place in the comedy and general world. It’s a pretty quick read, but I found myself pausing and ruminating frequently while reading. One memorable reflection was inspired by this quote,

“So my answer is no, I don’t have a need for my mother to ‘see me now.’ I just have the desire to see my mother again.” 

If you’re already a Tig Notaro fan, you won’t find much new about the life stories detailed in her memoir. The memoir is essentially written accounts of what is detailed in her stand up specials and documentary. Some readers might find this annoying and repetitive, but I didn’t mind it at all since I read I’m Just a Person about a year after watching her documentary. However, if you’re jumping into a Tig binge, I advise you to space out your consumption since it is pretty much a regurgitation of the same story in different formats. 

This was the first book that I’ve read in a long time that encouraged so many strangers to talk to me about it — someone sitting next to me on a train platform, the manager at a pie shop, any friend who saw me lugging it around. I was surprised at the great general interest in the book from passersby, but perhaps that speaks to the universal appeal of the fantastic Tig Notaro.