Tag Archives: breast cancer

The Bright Hour: A Memoir of Living and Dying by Nina Riggs

img_9131Nina Riggs, a poet, started writing a beautiful memoir upon her terminal cancer diagnosis. What follows is a beautiful composition of the scary, mundane, and loving moments that shapes one’s life as they know that it will eventually come to an end much sooner than they ever imagined. 

This is a beautiful, quick memoir that illuminates one person ruminations as they contemplate their impending mortality, leaving their closest loved ones behind, and what they feel they must accomplish in their shortened life. I finished and shed a few tears upon reading the touching acknowledgments, which were written by Riggs’s husband.

This is a good book for anyone who wants to read a touching memoir written by someone who received a terminal diagnosis that keeps things incredibly real without venturing toward overwrought territory. Read it. Hug your loved ones. Appreciate what you have. Enjoy the cozy moments with those you cherish.

Publication Date: 6 June 2017 by Simon & SchusterFormat: Hardcover.

Author: Nina Riggs

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I’m Just a Person by Tig Notaro

imjustaperson

I love Tig Notaro, which might just be because her mom died and she talks about it all of the time. It greatly influenced who she is and I relate to that. I always wonder if my obsession with my own mother’s death is because I was so young when it happened, but I don’t think that’s the case after reading Notaro’s account of losing her mother during middle adulthood. Loss of loved ones will always profoundly affect me because I love so much and I am a culmination of those I love and who love me, something that Notaro shares in her memoir about her own life. 

Notaro had a hell of a two years: she got diagnosed with a rare, potentially fatal infection, her mother died suddenly, she and her girlfriend broke up, she learned she had breast cancer, she experienced fertility issues, and so much more. This book details those experiences and expounds upon Tig’s wonderings about life, ties to family and friendship, and her place in the comedy and general world. It’s a pretty quick read, but I found myself pausing and ruminating frequently while reading. One memorable reflection was inspired by this quote,

“So my answer is no, I don’t have a need for my mother to ‘see me now.’ I just have the desire to see my mother again.” 

If you’re already a Tig Notaro fan, you won’t find much new about the life stories detailed in her memoir. The memoir is essentially written accounts of what is detailed in her stand up specials and documentary. Some readers might find this annoying and repetitive, but I didn’t mind it at all since I read I’m Just a Person about a year after watching her documentary. However, if you’re jumping into a Tig binge, I advise you to space out your consumption since it is pretty much a regurgitation of the same story in different formats. 

This was the first book that I’ve read in a long time that encouraged so many strangers to talk to me about it — someone sitting next to me on a train platform, the manager at a pie shop, any friend who saw me lugging it around. I was surprised at the great general interest in the book from passersby, but perhaps that speaks to the universal appeal of the fantastic Tig Notaro.