local girls by caroline zancan

Local GirlsIf I had read Local Girls during winter, I probably would have given it 3 stars and I’m not sure how to articulate why, as I feel the warm rays of sunshine on my back as I type this, I’m more inclined to give it 4 stars because the mood matches the season.

This book follows the stories of four nineteen year old girls and interweaves the stories of their individual and shared lives with the events that take place on one summer evening when they’re hanging out at their usual dive bar and someone (a celebrity) unexpectedly joins them. The way each vignette, peering into each of their character’s lives, are strung together is reminiscent of how a person would tell you their own life story, stopping and pausing along the way to fill in gaps that they accidentally made earlier as they were trying to tell you the most complete story possible. The following quote, something one of the girls says toward the end of the book, also adequately summarizes the method of vignette-style storytelling that occurs within the novel,

“the kind of thing that stuck with you and drifted back up in the middle of other, unrelated thoughts and conversations long after you heard it, sometimes for no reason that you could think of when you tried.”

For anyone who has grown up with our celebrity-obsessed culture, I’m sure you’ve daydreamed about a celebrity seamlessly joining in on your fun one night, which is exactly what happens to this group of friends. They all, for the most part, try to play it cool, just as you imagine yourself doing if a celebrity were to infiltrate your friend group on a night out on the town. This is the main event that counters the vignettes of the past.

Some reviewers have criticized Local Girls because they found it difficult to tell the characters apart – I think the similarity of the characters is partly intentional because most of the friend groups I knew in high school were largely indistinguishable to outsiders from the individuals who made them up… and sometimes even indistinguishable even to those who were in them. This book takes place as the girls are figuring out that they aren’t as in sync as they used to believe they were and they’re on the verge of going their separate ways to “discover” themselves. However, the majority of them don’t go to college to discover themselves as most YA books depict and maybe that’s why this novel feels odd to some readers. The natural untangling of the friend group is very slow-paced, as it normally is when these things happen in real life, and as happened to my own high school friend group after we graduated. This novel is definitely a slow burn, but it perfectly captured some very real moments that I experienced with my own friends as we went our separate ways that I haven’t seen in other contemporary novels lately. The plot mostly revolves around their, for the most part, very normal lives, which may not be for everyone, especially if you’re trying to mentally depart to an exotic place with a summer read.

Side note: One of the characters in Local Girls mentioned A Room of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf in a beautiful way which caused me to instantly add it to me TBR pile as I’ve never read any of her works. Are there other Virginia Woolf related things I should read soon?

Disclaimer: I was provided with an Advance Reader Copy of this book for free from the Penguin First to Read program. All opinions expressed in the following review are my own and have not been influenced by Penguin.

If you live in Canada, you can enter to win a copy of Local Girls by Caroline Zancan on Goodreads until 30 May 2015! If we’re not friends on Goodreads yet, add me 🙂 I’d love to get updates on what you’re reading!

Expected Publication Date: 30 June 2015 by Riverhead Books. Format: Ebook from Penguin First to Read.

Author: Caroline Zancan @twitter

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